My Twitter Feed

June 22, 2017

Archives:

14 Year Old Child Bride Facing Death Penalty for Murdering Husband -

Saturday, November 29, 2014

BREAKING: New Coal Disaster In West Virginia -

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

U.S. Hostage Freed by Colombia’s FARC Rebels (Video) -

Monday, October 28, 2013

Here’s Why The Zimmerman Verdict Matters -

Sunday, July 14, 2013

BREAKING! UK Government Spied On Allies At TWO G20 Summits (Video) -

Sunday, June 16, 2013

Swiss Support Tougher Asylum Legislation as Refugee Numbers Spike -

Monday, June 10, 2013

American Woman Killed in Syria Fighting for Terrorists, Syrian TV Claims (Video) -

Friday, May 31, 2013

CO2 in the Air Reached its Highest Level in Human History -

Friday, May 10, 2013

Terms of the New Abortion Bill Agreed by Irish Cabinet -

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Boston In Lockdown As Manhunt Intensifies -

Friday, April 19, 2013

2 Dead, Dozens Injured After Boston Marathon Bombing -

Monday, April 15, 2013

Fast Food Workers in New York Stage Surprise Strike -

Saturday, April 6, 2013

N. Korean Rhetoric Provokes Missile Shield Deployment -

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Eyewitness Accounts from Meiktila Massacre -

Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Sudan to Free All Political Prisoners -

Monday, April 1, 2013

A New Free Press In Burma Juxtaposed With Genocide: The World Will Be Watching -

Friday, March 29, 2013

Pressure Builds to End Ethnic Violence in Myanmar -

Friday, March 29, 2013

Activists Demand Action As Further Genocide Looms -

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Cyprus Reaches Last-Minute Bailout Deal With EU -

Monday, March 25, 2013

Myanmar Muslims Brace for Possible Genocide -

Sunday, March 24, 2013

The Corporate Supreme Court

–Written by Ralph Nader on July 18, 2011- Five Supreme Court Justices–Scalia, Thomas, Roberts, Alito and Kennedy are entrenching, in a whirlwind of judicial dictates, judicial legislating and sheer ideological judgments, a mega-corporate supremacy over the rights and remedies of individuals. The artificial entity called “the corporation” has no mention in our Constitution whose preamble starts with “We the People,” not “We the Corporation.” Taken together the decisions are brazenly over-riding sensible precedents, tearing apart the state common law of torts and blocking class actions, shoving aside jury verdicts, limiting people’s “standing to sue”, pre-empting state jurisdictions–anything that serves to…

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NLRB Obstructionism Could Lead To Union Militancy

Due to ongoing Republican obstructionism in the Senate, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is headed toward doomsday this summer. Come August, when two of the board members’ terms expire, the board will be functionally obsolete unless new members are confirmed by the Senate (which is unlikely to happen). This means that nobody will be enforcing the principal law that governs labor relations in this country. This could be disastrous for workers. Without a functioning NLRB, employers will be free to fire anyone who dares to show any sympathy for a union. In 2013, the United States already is seeing…

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In Philadelphia, Unregulated Capitalism Claims The Lives of 6 More Innocent Victims.

Last week the weapon of mass destruction known as unregulated capitalism tragically and senselessly claimed more innocent American lives. On Wednesday, June 5th, a demolition crew was working on taking down a building in Philadelphia when suddenly the whole building collapsed, taking out the building next door with it. The adjacent building housed a Salvation Army Thrift Store. This is where most of the victims were innocently going about their days when,  Without warning, the wrath of unregulated capitalism literally came crashing down upon their heads, needlessly ending 6 lives and forever altering 14 others. The contractor, Griffin Campbell Construction Co.,…

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The “Full Employment” Fallacy

Written by: Guy Fraser Guest Author,Repeacer at Repeace Turkiye and at Repeace Iceland What does a 1912 Baker and a 1959 Opel have in common? In 1973, a small team of engineers took an existing production car – an Opel made in 1959 – and made some changes. The result was demonstrated at the Wood River competition: A car that did 376 miles per gallon! 40 years later, in 2013, Volkswagen unveiled an eco car that does 313 miles per gallon. Oh, wait, that’s 63mpg less than what we could do in 1973! If we could achieve 376 miles per…

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Teacher Appreciation Week: Do Something!

Picture of teacher and student

Since 1985, Teacher Appreciation Week has officially taken place during the first full week of May, and National Teacher Day falls on Tuesday. Perhaps your children are engaged in school activities or assemblies which celebrate the impact teachers have on students’ lives. Teachers often work long hours for relatively low pay. Teachers continually give, often at the sake of their own expense and personal time in a cultural and political climate that often overlooks the full value of teachers’ contributions to society. And yet, practically all people can recall that one teacher who truly made a difference in their lives….

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May 1st is International Worker’s Day, Here’s Why it Matters:

In case you’ve missed it, today (5/1) is International Worker’s Day, also known as May Day. In America, the biggest holiday for workers is Labor Day, which falls in September. May Day is  the international worker’s equivalent of labor day. Around the world, protests and demonstrations have shown the extent to which workers are outraged and are showing their ability to flex their collective muscle. In Istanbul, Turkey, demonstrators caused a city-wide shut down. In Greece, striking union workers shut down train and ferry services. In Jakarta, an estimated 150,000 workers marched on the capital, demanding an increase in pay and…

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As Unemployment Persists, Employers Pick Cherries

For the unemployed, especially the “long term unemployed,” the prospects for the future look dimmer everyday. A recent NorthEastern University study regarding the affects of long term unemployment – specifically unemployment lasting six months or longer – points out, those with longer periods of unemployment, almost in a self fulfilling prophetic fashion, find their opportunities for a return to the labor force diminished, almost by the day. After sending out thousands of mock resumes in pairs to potential employers, researchers found that those with six months or more of unemployment, regardless of qualifications or experience, had less than a ten…

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The Real “Weapon of Mass Destruction”: Unregulated Capitalism

Last week’s news was  dominated by the story of the bombings at the Boston marathon, followed by the manhunt for the brothers who are suspected to have perpetrated those horrific acts. The attacks killed 3 and injured over 160. The manhunt caused the shutdown of the entire city of Boston for one day. It seemed as if the entire nation was shaken and captivated by this story. Unfortunately, the carnage and destruction of the Boston attacks was not the worst thing to happen in America last week. By sheer numbers and destruction, the Boston attacks pale in comparison to the…

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American Teacher: Documentary Review

Teaching is a tough job. That much is made clear in the documentary American Teacher  which was directed by Vanessa Roth. It’s a job that pays highly-educated professionals very little for such long hours. Teaching also requires great personal sacrifice, such as spending individual funds on classroom supplies, forgoing family time to attend school functions or grade papers, and even working a second or third job in order to barely cover the expenses of an average family. The documentary brings attention to the popular public opinion that teachers have short workdays and lots of vacation time. In reality, the workday of a teacher…

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Give Elected Officials 401(k) Plans

Lately, there has been a lot of talk by the elected officials in many States, on ending pensions for public employees such as teachers, firefighters and police. Some of them even enacted on these talks, to pass laws to end guaranteed pension plans and turn them into 401 (k) option. And I say, let’s do the same for them: It is time for all elected officials, from the $186,000-a-year congressman to the small-town mayor, to no longer have taxpayer-funded pensions, but rather take a portion of their salaries and put them in 401(k) plans. With the types of benefit plans…

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Fast Food Workers in New York Stage Surprise Strike

On Thursday April 4th, for the second time in less than a year, workers at fast food restaurants in New York City staged a surprise strike. Over 400 workers at restaurants like McDonalds, Taco Bell, Wendy’s, and Burger King walked off the job. The workers, who mostly earn the federally mandated minimum wage of $7.25, demanded a living wage of $15 an hour, as well as the right to union representation. The strike was timed to coincide with the 45th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, who was killed while in Memphis, Tenn. to support striking sanitation…

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Momentum Building for Paid Sick Leave Laws in U.S. Cities.

The United States of America is the only industrialized nation in the world that does not guarantee any paid sick leave to its workers. Worldwide, over 145 countries guarantee all workers paid time off for illnesses. In the absence of any federal policy on mandated sick leave in the near future, American cities like Portland, Seattle, Washington D.C., and San Francisco have taken action requiring all workers have access to paid time off for sicknesses. The pressure is growing on more cities, and even some states to look at enacting similar legislation. New York and Philadelphia could be close to…

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It’s Time for a Worker’s Movement in USA

The labor movement has a history that is marked by violence, bloodshed, employer intimidation and oppression. The deck has always been stacked against the unions. It has never been easy for workers to have their voice be heard in the workplace. The modern American labor movement can be traced directly back to the 1930s and Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s “New Deal” legislation which created a real social safety net for the working class and the poor. Social Security, which the labor movement helped lobby into law, was a major development for the working classes. It meant that the elderly in this…

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The Main Street Economy

Economic reports over the past week have been largely dominated by the seemingly good news of record highs in the DOW Jones Industrial Index (DJIA,) accompanied by a decline in the filing for new unemployment benefit claims. Core Logic, which specializes in monitoring and analyzing home pricing and real estate markets, reported this week that housing prices have improved by 9.7% over their averages this time last year, making it the biggest recorded increase since 2006. Thus potentially explaining both the records being posted in the DOW, as well as the general surge in the financial markets. The typical players…

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The Economy is Booming, but for Whom?

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose to over 14,000 points in recent weeks. The Dow reaching this high number first happened in 2007, the year before the Great Recession hit America like a ton of bricks, wiping out the retirement savings for millions of Americans and changing the nation’s confidence in the markets. I suppose now would be a safe time to announce to you that we are the only ones hurting, the economy is doing great! Conventional beltway wisdom these days seems to be that what is good for Wall Street is good for America. With the market eclipsing…

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Death of Organized Labor: Death of Middle Class

There has been quite a bit of talk recently, about the death of organized labor. With labor on its so-called “death bed”, perhaps now would be a good time to reflect on some of the things organized labor did for Americans in the 20th century. A typical anti-union argument that people will often invoke is “unions were once useful, but they are no longer necessary.” With this argument, critics of unions are admitting that unions helped build the middle class by establishing the 40 hour work-week, the weekend, paid time off, increased wages and benefits, and increased safety in the…

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So Hopelessly Dumb

The traditional learning process implemented in many schools is largely a lie. Partially out of necessity, and partially out of fear of change, the American education system continues to adhere to the egg-crate mentality of teaching. Students continue to be grouped arbitrarily by age rather than ability, even though learner readiness can be easily assessed. Plus, subjects are still mostly taught in isolation, rather than in tandem. Worst of all, knowledge continues to be taught as a series of discreet skill sets with clear beginnings and ends. In essence, schools today are run as if learning is nothing more than…

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A Teacher’s Time

teacher pay, teacher performance

Statistics show that more than half of all teachers will leave the classroom in their first five years on the job. I taught high school English for six years and am steadfast in the knowledge that I became an excellent teacher. I also know that the demands of the job cannot make up for the price I had to pay. That price was time. Test scores or bonus pay rarely motivate performance. Many teachers feel drawn to the field because they seek to share a love of learning. The rewards of helping a student unlock their potential are undeniable. Yet,…

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“Cliff Notes” Version of: Why Are We in This Economic Mess?

Remember in high school when you didn’t want to struggle through Hamlet or Macbeth, you turned to the synopsis and criticism of Cliff Notes? I know I am dating myself, because nowadays students in high school and university acquire all the information from the Internet; which we all know holds irrefutable facts. What I will attempt to answer, in a simple manner like Cliff Notes, is the question: How did we get in this economic mess?: After the Economic Crisis of 2008, it was obvious that something had gone wrong. Banks had to be bailed out.  Houses were lost. Unemployment…

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Older Jobless Workers Face Unhealthy Bias

America’s latest economic crisis is paralyzing an entire generation. What should be done with the estimated 2 million older job seekers who often are the victims of subtle discrimination, but have no real legal ways to defend themselves? Sara Rix of the AARP’s Public Policy Institute said, in April 2012, that the job seekers 55 years old and above had been out of work for an average of 60 weeks; those under 55, an average 38.5 weeks. Meanwhile there is a push in Congress to raise the Medicare age to 67, which really is a way to cut Medicare benefits….

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